Moeilijk te zeggen

Robert Pinsky leest 'Impossible to tell' voor. Lisa draagt een baret.
Robert Pinsky draagt ‘Impossible to tell’ voor. Lisa draagt een baret.

Het was te voorspellen: ik houd van het slimme meisje Lisa Simpson (ook van Nelson, overigens). In een Simpsons-aflevering van een paar dagen geleden ging Lisa naar een lezing van Robert Pinsky, die onder algemeen enthousiasme een fragment van het gedicht ‘Impossible to Tell’ voordroeg. Daarom besloot ik deze dichter en zijn gedicht eens te googlen. En kijk, wat vindt men dan? Het blijkt een door en door Amerikaans gedicht te zijn over loyauteit en plotseling komt er een Belgenmop in voor. Uit een passage over grappen:

There’s one
A journalist told me. He heard it while a hero

Of the South African freedom movement was speaking
To elderly Jews. The speaker’s own right arm
Had been blown off by right-wing letter-bombers.

He told his listeners they had to cast their ballots
For the ANC—a group the old Jews feared
As “in with the Arabs.” But they started weeping

As the old one-armed fighter told them their country
Needed them to vote for what was right, their vote
Could make a country their children could return to

From London and Chicago. The moved old people
Applauded wildly, and the speaker’s friend
Whispered to the journalist, “It’s the Belgian Army

Joke come to life.” I wish I could tell it
To Elliot. In the Belgian Army, the feud
Between the Flemings and Walloons grew vicious,

So out of hand the army could barely function.
Finally one commander assembled his men
In one great room, to deal with things directly.

They stood before him at attention. “All Flemings,”
He ordered, “to the left wall.” Half the men
Clustered to the left. “Now all Walloons,” he ordered,

“Move to the right.” An equal number crowded
Against the right wall. Only one man remained
At attention in the middle: “What are you, soldier?”

Saluting, the man said, “Sir, I am a Belgian.”
“Why, that’s astonishing, Corporal—what’s your name?”
Saluting again, “Rabinowitz,” he answered:

A joke that seems at first to be a story
About the Jews. But as the renga describes
Religious meaning by moving in drifting petals

And brittle leaves that touch and die and suffer
The changing winds that riffle the gutter swirl,
So in the joke, just under the raucous music

Of Fleming, Jew, Walloon, a courtly allegiance
Moves to the dulcimer, gavotte and bow,
Over the banana tree the moon in autumn—

Allegiance to a state impossible to tell.

(Foto via The Lisa Simpson Book Club)

2 gedachtes over “Moeilijk te zeggen

Geef een reactie

Vul je gegevens in of klik op een icoon om in te loggen.

WordPress.com logo

Je reageert onder je WordPress.com account. Log uit /  Bijwerken )

Google+ photo

Je reageert onder je Google+ account. Log uit /  Bijwerken )

Twitter-afbeelding

Je reageert onder je Twitter account. Log uit /  Bijwerken )

Facebook foto

Je reageert onder je Facebook account. Log uit /  Bijwerken )

Verbinden met %s